http://adviceforvegans.com/post/97440220824/being-vegan-is-not-limited-to-animal-rights-being adviceforvegans
adviceforvegans:

Being vegan is not limited to animal rights. Being vegan is about standing up all sentient beings, including humans. This is why vegans cannot buy from brands such as Nike or shop at Primark. Why? Because these places supply from sweatshops. I’m sure you’re probably wondering what a sweatshop is exactly and what on earth it has to do with veganism. So I’m here to explain it to you. Here are some not-so-fun facts about sweatshops (all sourced of course):UNITE, the US garment workers union, defines a ”sweatshop” as any factory that does not respect workers’ right to organise an independent union. Global Exchange and other anti-sweatshop movements would add that a sweatshop is any work place that does not pay its workers a Living Wage, that is enough money to live off and support the basic needs of their families.Workers in sweatshops can be fined on a daily basis. In some sweatshops workers are fined for arriving late, taking too long in the toilet, forgetting to turn lights off and making mistakes. A fine can cost up to two months’ pay: if workers cannot afford to pay fines they are unable to quit their job and are effectively enslaved.At one Mexican sweatshop, workers are expected to meet a quota of 1,000 pieces a day. That could mean creating 1,000 jeans, 1,000 shoes or 1,000 rugby balls a day, depending on the product a factory produces. For the Mexican workers to meet this quota they would need to create MORE than one piece a minute. This quota is so high that the workers are unable to have a drink or go to the toilet all day.Over 75% of people working in clothing sweatshops are women. Many are mothers, and the long hours and little pay can often take its toll on their families. Children often see little of their parents, and in many countries can’t be sent to school due to lack of money to afford to pay fees.In May 2011 a report on Asian sportswear supply chains highlighted how factories supplying multinational sports and garment brands are routinely breaking labour rights laws. Some factories denied workers the legal minimum wage, while others linked the payment of basic wages to unachievable production targets which workers struggled desperately to meet.More than 300 garment workers were sacked in Cambodia after taking a stand to demand their right to a living wage. According to a recent Cambodian living wage study, garment workers need £60 a month to support their families instead of the £38 the factory was paying them.In February 1997, 200 Vietnamese sweatshop workers fell ill and were hospitalised by over exposure to acetane, a chemical solvent used in production of McDonalds Happy Meal toys. Despite such incidents the factory reportedly refused to improve its ventilation system for its workers.Workers at the Yongshen toy factory in China share filthy, overcrowded dormitories infested with bed bugs. Twenty-four workers share each room, sleeping in narrow triple-level metal beds. Twenty-four workers must share a toilet and in the sweltering summer heat must work drenched in their own sweat. The Yongshen factory produces toys for Hasbro and for RC2 the makers of popular Bratz dolls. Of the total retail cost of a garment, less than 1% is shared between the people who made it in many sweatshops.It is not uncommon for people who try to fight for better conditions in sweatshops to be persecuted. Trade union leader Anwar Ansari, producing clothes for M&S in India, claims he was kidnapped and brutally beaten on August 25th 2010. "I am exhausted to death now…. None of us have time to go to toilet or drink water. The supervisors are pressuring and nagging us all the time. We are tired and dirty. We work without stop and we are still reproached by the supervisors.” - Worker making New Balance shoes, in China for the Beijing Olympics. Many footballs are hand stitched in sweatshops by children who are under paid and over worked. On the World day against Child Labour in 2006 some of these children were given the opportunity to play with these footballs for the first time, as they were taken from the factories they worked in and enrolled in schools set up by the UN.In 2005 the building of the Spectrum/Shahriyar Sweater factory in Bangladesh collapsed killing 64 workers and injuring 80. These deaths were entirely preventable. The building collapsed as a result of factory owners violating building codes and health and safety regulations.Foxconn, a major firm responsible for the assembly of Apple products was forced to investigate conditions at one of its Chinese factories following a string of 17 employee suicides.Trade Unions play a vital role in ensuring workers across the world can achieve a Living wage and decent working conditions. Unions give workers the confidence to say things together that they would be too scared to say on their own. But many factories find ways to prevent their employees forming trade unions.Workers producing basic teeshirts for Asda In Bangladesh are earning just a quarter of the amount they need to properly feed, clothe and educate their families. ActionAid’s report, Asda: Poverty Guaranteed, says Asda could easily turn this around by paying workers an extra 2p on each £4 t-shirt it buys.A survey of 10 factories in Bangladesh found that no factory had a regular working week of less than 60 hours, more than half exceeded this and four of the factories were found to have average working weeks of over 80 hours. In the UK a basic working week is 48 hours.Many sweatshops are monitored by inspectors who are paid by the clothing industry. Often they will call ahead of inspection giving factory owners time to tidy the work floor, get rid of child workers and coach employees about what to say.Many female factory workers cannot risk becoming pregnant for fear of being fired. Some supervisors treat female workers so severely that they must return to work sooner than two weeks after giving birth or lose their jobs.On the 25th of February 2010, 21 workers were killed and 50 injured after a fire at a sweater factory in Bangladesh. The fire caused by an electric short circuit quickly spread through the factory fuelled by the inflammable materials stored there. Workers could not escape through the fire exits which were locked and stairways were blocked with materials.One factory in Leicester was discovered by a Channel 4 Dispatches documentary to be paying workers £2.50 an hour – less half the minimum wage. Many of the employees were in the UK on student visas, working illegally, and had no way of challenging their exploitative conditions.Violence in sweatshops is sadly a common occurrence. A recent report carried out by the National Labour Committee found that employees at sweatshops producing lingerie for the Victoria’s Secret brand, could be slapped or beaten by supervisors for making minor errors or falling behind on their production goals.Sometimes simply closing a sweatshop down is not the answer as it forces the workers to seek alternative employment. After US Senator Tom Harkin’s Child Labour Deterrence Act was introduced in the 1990s, an estimated 50,000 children were dismissed from their garment industry jobs in Asia, leaving many to resort to jobs such as stone-crushing, street hustling, and prostitution.At one British Sweatshop an undercover reporter discovered there was no central heating in some parts of the building and employees were forced to work in freezing cold conditions throughout the winter. The same reporter found herself trapped in the female toilet after boxes stacked in front of the door fell and blocked her exit.Distressed denim is often created by a process called sand-blasting. Workers fire sand under high pressure at jeans, and this sand breaks down into fine silica sand particles, which workers inhale and this often causes the fatal lung disease Silicosis. In Turkey alone, 47 former sandblasting operators are known to have died as a direct result of sandblasting related Silicosis.Thousands of people across the world are employed as home workers, producing goods for the UK high street from home. Whilst home working can be a positive choice for some, home workers are often the most exploited workers in the industry. They have precarious employment status, a lack of legal protection and are isolated from fellow workers which makes it difficult for them to become involved in trade unions.A Social Audit is an inspection of working conditions in factories. A typical audit will involve: 1. a document review: wage sheets, time sheets and personal records are examined. 2. Site Inspection: this is a tour of the factory to check for any health and safety problems and observe the workers. 3. Interviews: managers, supervisors and workers are all interviewed. The best audits also consult the workers trade unions and local labour rights groups.There are many different sweatshops across the world producing a wide variety products. Some of the worst industries are shoes, clothing, rugs, toys, chocolate, bananas and coffee.Factory workers in El Salvador, Spain producing products for labels including Adidas, Reebok, Puma and Gap recently won major improvements to their workplace following the release of a negative report on conditions at the factory. Previously sealed doors and windows were opened to improve ventilation and fans have been installed. Workers are now provided with detailed pay stubbs in Spanish detailing the hours they are paid for and noting pay rates and any deductions to pay.In November 2005 The International Labour Rights Fund filed a lawsuit in the U.S. that charged Coca Cola and its bottling facility in Turkey with torture of Union activists and their families. The International Labour Rights Fund alleged that employees were beaten with clubs, tear gassed, and then jailed in an effort to force the employees to abandon union efforts.See more here.Also check out sweatshop free shopping!

adviceforvegans:

Being vegan is not limited to animal rights. Being vegan is about standing up all sentient beings, including humans. This is why vegans cannot buy from brands such as Nike or shop at Primark. Why? Because these places supply from sweatshops. 

I’m sure you’re probably wondering what a sweatshop is exactly and what on earth it has to do with veganism. So I’m here to explain it to you. Here are some not-so-fun facts about sweatshops (all sourced of course):

UNITE, the US garment workers union, defines a ”sweatshop” as any factory that does not respect workers’ right to organise an independent union. Global Exchange and other anti-sweatshop movements would add that a sweatshop is any work place that does not pay its workers a Living Wage, that is enough money to live off and support the basic needs of their families.

Workers in sweatshops can be fined on a daily basis. In some sweatshops workers are fined for arriving late, taking too long in the toilet, forgetting to turn lights off and making mistakes. A fine can cost up to two months’ pay: if workers cannot afford to pay fines they are unable to quit their job and are effectively enslaved.

At one Mexican sweatshop, workers are expected to meet a quota of 1,000 pieces a day. That could mean creating 1,000 jeans, 1,000 shoes or 1,000 rugby balls a day, depending on the product a factory produces. For the Mexican workers to meet this quota they would need to create MORE than one piece a minute. This quota is so high that the workers are unable to have a drink or go to the toilet all day.

Over 75% of people working in clothing sweatshops are women. Many are mothers, and the long hours and little pay can often take its toll on their families. Children often see little of their parents, and in many countries can’t be sent to school due to lack of money to afford to pay fees.

In May 2011 a report on Asian sportswear supply chains highlighted how factories supplying multinational sports and garment brands are routinely breaking labour rights laws. Some factories denied workers the legal minimum wage, while others linked the payment of basic wages to unachievable production targets which workers struggled desperately to meet.

More than 300 garment workers were sacked in Cambodia after taking a stand to demand their right to a living wage. According to a recent Cambodian living wage study, garment workers need £60 a month to support their families instead of the £38 the factory was paying them.

In February 1997, 200 Vietnamese sweatshop workers fell ill and were hospitalised by over exposure to acetane, a chemical solvent used in production of McDonalds Happy Meal toys. Despite such incidents the factory reportedly refused to improve its ventilation system for its workers.

Workers at the Yongshen toy factory in China share filthy, overcrowded dormitories infested with bed bugs. Twenty-four workers share each room, sleeping in narrow triple-level metal beds. Twenty-four workers must share a toilet and in the sweltering summer heat must work drenched in their own sweat. The Yongshen factory produces toys for Hasbro and for RC2 the makers of popular Bratz dolls. 

Of the total retail cost of a garment, less than 1% is shared between the people who made it in many sweatshops.

It is not uncommon for people who try to fight for better conditions in sweatshops to be persecuted. Trade union leader Anwar Ansari, producing clothes for M&S in India, claims he was kidnapped and brutally beaten on August 25th 2010. 

"I am exhausted to death now…. None of us have time to go to toilet or drink water. The supervisors are pressuring and nagging us all the time. We are tired and dirty. We work without stop and we are still reproached by the supervisors.” - Worker making New Balance shoes, in China for the Beijing Olympics. 

Many footballs are hand stitched in sweatshops by children who are under paid and over worked. On the World day against Child Labour in 2006 some of these children were given the opportunity to play with these footballs for the first time, as they were taken from the factories they worked in and enrolled in schools set up by the UN.

In 2005 the building of the Spectrum/Shahriyar Sweater factory in Bangladesh collapsed killing 64 workers and injuring 80. These deaths were entirely preventable. The building collapsed as a result of factory owners violating building codes and health and safety regulations.

Foxconn, a major firm responsible for the assembly of Apple products was forced to investigate conditions at one of its Chinese factories following a string of 17 employee suicides.

Trade Unions play a vital role in ensuring workers across the world can achieve a Living wage and decent working conditions. Unions give workers the confidence to say things together that they would be too scared to say on their own. But many factories find ways to prevent their employees forming trade unions.

Workers producing basic teeshirts for Asda In Bangladesh are earning just a quarter of the amount they need to properly feed, clothe and educate their families. ActionAid’s report, Asda: Poverty Guaranteed, says Asda could easily turn this around by paying workers an extra 2p on each £4 t-shirt it buys.

A survey of 10 factories in Bangladesh found that no factory had a regular working week of less than 60 hours, more than half exceeded this and four of the factories were found to have average working weeks of over 80 hours. In the UK a basic working week is 48 hours.

Many sweatshops are monitored by inspectors who are paid by the clothing industry. Often they will call ahead of inspection giving factory owners time to tidy the work floor, get rid of child workers and coach employees about what to say.

Many female factory workers cannot risk becoming pregnant for fear of being fired. Some supervisors treat female workers so severely that they must return to work sooner than two weeks after giving birth or lose their jobs.

On the 25th of February 2010, 21 workers were killed and 50 injured after a fire at a sweater factory in Bangladesh. The fire caused by an electric short circuit quickly spread through the factory fuelled by the inflammable materials stored there. Workers could not escape through the fire exits which were locked and stairways were blocked with materials.

One factory in Leicester was discovered by a Channel 4 Dispatches documentary to be paying workers £2.50 an hour – less half the minimum wage. Many of the employees were in the UK on student visas, working illegally, and had no way of challenging their exploitative conditions.

Violence in sweatshops is sadly a common occurrence. A recent report carried out by the National Labour Committee found that employees at sweatshops producing lingerie for the Victoria’s Secret brand, could be slapped or beaten by supervisors for making minor errors or falling behind on their production goals.

Sometimes simply closing a sweatshop down is not the answer as it forces the workers to seek alternative employment. After US Senator Tom Harkin’s Child Labour Deterrence Act was introduced in the 1990s, an estimated 50,000 children were dismissed from their garment industry jobs in Asia, leaving many to resort to jobs such as stone-crushing, street hustling, and prostitution.

At one British Sweatshop an undercover reporter discovered there was no central heating in some parts of the building and employees were forced to work in freezing cold conditions throughout the winter. The same reporter found herself trapped in the female toilet after boxes stacked in front of the door fell and blocked her exit.

Distressed denim is often created by a process called sand-blasting. Workers fire sand under high pressure at jeans, and this sand breaks down into fine silica sand particles, which workers inhale and this often causes the fatal lung disease Silicosis. In Turkey alone, 47 former sandblasting operators are known to have died as a direct result of sandblasting related Silicosis.

Thousands of people across the world are employed as home workers, producing goods for the UK high street from home. Whilst home working can be a positive choice for some, home workers are often the most exploited workers in the industry. They have precarious employment status, a lack of legal protection and are isolated from fellow workers which makes it difficult for them to become involved in trade unions.

A Social Audit is an inspection of working conditions in factories. A typical audit will involve: 

1. a document review: wage sheets, time sheets and personal records are examined. 

2. Site Inspection: this is a tour of the factory to check for any health and safety problems and observe the workers. 

3. Interviews: managers, supervisors and workers are all interviewed. The best audits also consult the workers trade unions and local labour rights groups.

There are many different sweatshops across the world producing a wide variety products. Some of the worst industries are shoes, clothing, rugs, toys, chocolate, bananas and coffee.

Factory workers in El Salvador, Spain producing products for labels including Adidas, Reebok, Puma and Gap recently won major improvements to their workplace following the release of a negative report on conditions at the factory. Previously sealed doors and windows were opened to improve ventilation and fans have been installed. Workers are now provided with detailed pay stubbs in Spanish detailing the hours they are paid for and noting pay rates and any deductions to pay.

In November 2005 The International Labour Rights Fund filed a lawsuit in the U.S. that charged Coca Cola and its bottling facility in Turkey with torture of Union activists and their families. The International Labour Rights Fund alleged that employees were beaten with clubs, tear gassed, and then jailed in an effort to force the employees to abandon union efforts.

See more here.
Also check out sweatshop free shopping!

http://howtobeterrell.tumblr.com/post/97757498981/i-just-find-it-so-strange-that-janets howtobeterrell

I just find it so strange that Janet’s

highkeygay:

majiinboo:

howtobeterrell:

One black titty at a Super Bowl game could tarnish her 20+ year career

But Madonna has been flashing us her dusty hot pocket for the past 3 thousand years she’s been in the game and has walked away completely unscathed….

Hmm

image

DUSTY HOT POCKET

http://babybowsers.tumblr.com/post/97768283827/me-petting-a-cat-nice-cat-bathes-self-where babybowsers

babybowsers:

me: *petting a cat* nice

cat: *bathes self where i touched it*

me: image

http://postracialcomments.tumblr.com/post/97737067260/a-texas-man-is-under-arrest-after-gunning-down-a postracialcomments
flawlesstitties:

otherbully1:

internetsgreatesthits:

cutebeam:

softboycollective:

postracialcomments:


A Texas man is under arrest after gunning down a SWAT team member as the officer quietly tried to climb in through the apartment’s window during predawn hours.
Police State USAreports  that a resident fatally shot Detective Charles “Chuck” Dinwiddie as the officer climbed in through a ground level window as part of a “no knock” raid. The officers were there due to suspicion that residents were in possession of controlled substances.
Upon hearing a noise, resident Marvin Louis Guy, 50, opened fire on the unidentified officers, shooting three others as well, although only one fatally.
Guy is currently being held on capital murder charges in connection with Dinwiddie’s death, even though it’s unclear how Guy was supposed to know that the men crawling in through the window were police officers since they hadn’t identified themselves.
The evidence sheet lists a laptop, a safe, a pistol, and a glass pipe, but no drugs were found. Given the evidence, why did police deem it necessary to seek a “no knock” warrant and why did a judge sign off on it?
Very little is known about Mr. Guy, but Dinwiddie left behind two children, all because his SWAT team went creeping into a home where the residents didn’t even have any drugs. Is that the best use of law enforcement tax dollars?
Guy’s bond has been set at $3 million dollars.

Source
Thank you lieutenantnorals!

"cop breaks and enters with state approval, gets his ass shot"

brah………………. BRUV……………………..

this happened in Texas where it is perfectly legal to shoot and kill someone who is breaking into your home

Literally everybody knows that in Texas you can open fire on someone who comes onto your property without permission. What in the hell did they expect??

Where the NRA at? In the largest pro-gun state of Texass, those second amendment rights only apply if you’re white.

flawlesstitties:

otherbully1:

internetsgreatesthits:

cutebeam:

softboycollective:

postracialcomments:

A Texas man is under arrest after gunning down a SWAT team member as the officer quietly tried to climb in through the apartment’s window during predawn hours.

Police State USAreports  that a resident fatally shot Detective Charles “Chuck” Dinwiddie as the officer climbed in through a ground level window as part of a “no knock” raid. The officers were there due to suspicion that residents were in possession of controlled substances.

Upon hearing a noise, resident Marvin Louis Guy, 50, opened fire on the unidentified officers, shooting three others as well, although only one fatally.

Guy is currently being held on capital murder charges in connection with Dinwiddie’s death, even though it’s unclear how Guy was supposed to know that the men crawling in through the window were police officers since they hadn’t identified themselves.

The evidence sheet lists a laptop, a safe, a pistol, and a glass pipe, but no drugs were found. Given the evidence, why did police deem it necessary to seek a “no knock” warrant and why did a judge sign off on it?

Very little is known about Mr. Guy, but Dinwiddie left behind two children, all because his SWAT team went creeping into a home where the residents didn’t even have any drugs. Is that the best use of law enforcement tax dollars?

Guy’s bond has been set at $3 million dollars.

Source

Thank you lieutenantnorals!

"cop breaks and enters with state approval, gets his ass shot"

brah………………. BRUV……………………..

this happened in Texas where it is perfectly legal to shoot and kill someone who is breaking into your home

Literally everybody knows that in Texas you can open fire on someone who comes onto your property without permission. What in the hell did they expect??

Where the NRA at? In the largest pro-gun state of Texass, those second amendment rights only apply if you’re white.

i really like how it looks, and i’d probably be more likely to wear it on a skirt. i also have a bad habit of losing all my cool jackets so :/

My one problem is that I’m incapable of wearing a denim skirt gracefully. I never know how to sit in one properly and the whole world ends up seeing my underwear

http://justice4mikebrown.tumblr.com/post/97741035110/sept-17-1-10-pm justice4mikebrown

Sept. 17 1:10 pm

dynastylnoire:

justice4mikebrown:

WHOA

i own probably 2847584 patches but have thus far been too lazy to actually put them on the denim jacket i thrifted just for that purpose. i might put them on a denim skirt instead since that seems to be a thing now

That actually sounds super cute… I’ve even thought about offering to have people mail their stuff to me so that I can iron and sew the patches on myself. I don’t know how much use I’d get out of a denim vest, unfortunately, so maybe I’ll try a skirt or a bag instead.

To be honest I’m really glad that I’m queer because otherwise I’d almost definitely be mormon right now. I’d be at BYU and saving myself for marriage and trying to find a man who would be a good spiritual leader for my household.

http://zeekayart.com/post/97720017422 zeekayart

zeekayart:

a guide for people who can’t tell the 90s from the early 2000s apart

  • if people are dressed in neon, it’s the 90simage
  • if people are dressed in space age metallics, it’s the 2000simage

baby fever is a very real phenomenon

i’ve somehow regressed to being a 14 year old mormon girl again and watching aquamarine and watching wedding themed reality shows and romcoms and being emotional about it

http://mymodernmet.tumblr.com/post/96416323076/andrew-zo-designed-the-clifton-engagement-ring mymodernmet

phiftycent:

devlinthegreat:

rose-eee:

mymodernmet:

Andrew Zo designed the Clifton engagement ring box, a unique product that not only conceals the ring in a slim, wallet-size container before the big proposal, but also unfolds to show the ring pirouetting like a blooming flower.

holy shit

Fuck this is nice

propose to me

http://saltwaterandink.tumblr.com/post/86491910008/more-fun-facts-about-ancient-celtic-marriage-laws saltwaterandink

thefingerfuckingfemalefury:

gallifrey-feels:

More fun facts about ancient Celtic marriage laws: There were no laws against interclass or interracial marriage, no laws against open homosexual relationships (although they weren’t considered ‘marriages’ since the definition of a marriage was ‘couple with child’), no requirement for women to take their husband’s names or give up their property, but comedians couldn’t get married

It’s Adam and Eve not Adam Sandler and Eve

http://micdotcom.tumblr.com/post/97681477953/the-miss-indian-world-pageant-is-the-answer-to micdotcom

micdotcom:

The Miss Indian World pageant is the answer to Miss America we’ve been looking for

When Kira Kazantsev was crowned the new Miss America on Sunday night, a feeling of déjá vu set in.

Not only was she white — like all but nine of the 94 winners before her — she also fit snugly into a narrowly defined standard of Western female attractiveness: early 20s, long flowing hair and a thin, painstakingly tanned physique that would not seem out of place in a Victoria’s Secret catalog.

In many ways, the Miss Indian World pageant’s definition of what American beauty truly entails is the ideological antithesis to Miss America. Indeed, since 1984, this five-day competition based in Albuquerque, N.M., has honored Native American woman for their contributions to their communities, not their bikini bodies. The top award is given to the contestant who “best represents her culture,” according to Al Jazeera.

Why this pageant is world’s better 

http://feellng.com/post/96446038601 feellng
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